Ship Searching For MH370 Flight Mysteriously Vanishes

Ship searching for missing MH370 flight mysteriously disappears

The ship searching for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 mysteriously disappeared with absolutely zero explanation, according to officials. 

On 22 January, the Seabed Constructor began its mission to search for the missing plane which disappeared in March 2014.

On Thursday, after only 10 days of searching, the ship turned off its Automatic Identification System (AIS) with no explanation.

Gizadeathstar.com reports: As one might expect, in the absence of explanations, speculations and theories abound, including a theory that the vessel went on a secret treasure hunt:

Kevin Rupp, a precision machinist who has been publicly tracking Seabed Constructor, said that was highly unlikely.

“I have nothing polite to say about those who are spreading rumours that Seabed Constructor was really on a treasure hunt,” he said.

He said all speculation was simply guesswork, and the tracker may have been turned off to prevent unnecessary distress to the victim’s families. “If the ship detected possible contacts [with MH370] its most likely action would be to move to the spot of the detections and lower an ROV – a tethered remote-controlled small vehicle,” he said.

“To do this, Seabed Constructor would have to sit still in one place for a long period of time and this would be very noticeable to those of us watching through our AIS tracking apps … I believe they may have turned the AIS transmitter to low power mode to prevent us from speculating that they had found something and causing undue distress for the next of kin.”

But now note something, and I hope it bothers the reader as much as it bothers me:

In the single update released by Malaysian officials so far, it was confirmed MH370 had not been found in the first week of the search, between 22 and 30 January.

During that time, Seabed Constructor had searched a “high priority” area that Australian researchers had pinpointed as the plane’s likely resting place. Between 2014 and 2017, Australian authorities had conducted a three-year search across 120,000sq km that failed to find the plane. Afterwards, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) identified the priority area as the next place to look.

Scientist Richard Cole said on Twitter he believed the ship had spent the three days in an area it had previously searched, in the south-east corner of the search area.

And that’s the problem: why search in an area that has already been searched? Why, indeed, are we searching in the Indian Ocean at all, when, as I’ve outlined above, there are varying witness accounts of the flight going in other directions? Why would an American “source” get on national television and offer silly theories about Iran, a long way away from the western Australian coast? Any why, indeed, turn off the ship’s position transponder? I suspect a different explanation than that offered in the article, namely, that the ship may not have been where people think it was, and that it was looking elsewhere, and if so, that may mean the Malaysian government has some intelligence it is not, as yet, sharing.

What do you think?

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